Hear ‘ye Hear ‘ye! Fig & Quince has a podcast!

Hello friends! One of the interesting things that happened to me while I’m here in Iran is that I was approached to do a podcast series. I’ve been a podcast junkie myself for like ever (like totally! & way before Serial) and absolutely love the genre; and of course as a blogger – namely someone who is compelled to record and share observances and thoughts and stories – the concept of creating a podcast channel immediately and intensely appealed to me and hence, I jumped on the idea! So it was that the “Podcast tales of Anjir ‘o Beh” was born! (“Anjir o beh” is Persian for “fig and quince” in case you were wondering.)

I debated about doing a bilingual version  – one in Persian and one in English – and I really really do want to be able to offer the podcast stories in both languages in the future so that those of you who don’t understand Persian (Farsi) can also have a listen but at least for the first season, it was not feasible. You should go have a listen anyhow! 😉

I’m happy to let you know that the 1st season is in the bag: a couple of teasers about Norooz (the Persian New Year) were released (here and here) earlier in the spring and  the first full episode – an introduction – finally went live a few days ago.

Going forward, there will be new episodes every Sunday and Wednesday at 4 pm (Iran time.)

The 2nd Fig and Quince podcast episode is also now up as well. And it’s a really good one! In this episode I chat with Haleh Farajollahi, a dear childhood friend (our moms were classmates and BFFs) and she tells mesmerizing tales of witnessing the sight and sound of thousands of silkworms feasting on grape leaves and the beautiful heirloom cloths her grandmother then made with this harvested silk and other impeccable housekeeping customs of her grandmother (let’s put it this way, Martha Stewart would have LOVED Haleh’s grandmother!) and the delicious food of the northern region of Iran.

The cover photo is a souvenir pic of me and Haleh just before we went down to the studio to tape our episode. (The turbaned gentleman in between us is none other than Ferdowsi, the revered Persian poet who is to Iranians what Homer is to the Greeks.)

Here are a couple of other photos related to what we talked about in this podcast:

چادر شب ابریشمی قدیمی شمال Silk Persian handmade cloth

One of the heirloom silk cloths: handmade and designed and dyed by Haleh’s grandmother with the silk harvested by the silkworms feasting on grape leaves. Isn’t that enchanting?

چادر شب ابریشمی قدیمی شمال Silk Persian handmade cloth

And this is another such priceless heirloom silk cloth. Haleh says she very carefully stores all of the cloths passed on to her by her grandmother and hopes to pass them on to her own children and that each year, just before Norooz and as an integral aspect of the “shaking the house” part of greeting the Persian New Year, she takes them out and airs them and admires them, before storing them again for another year.

What a treasure trove !

little persian girl with stuffed animal - Iran (Fig and Quince podcast)

And here’s Haleh as a little girl with her little stuffed animal. I mean: how adorable is she?

Do go and have a listen to this delicious 2nd episode of Fig & Quince podcast series (even if you don’t speak Persian, haha) and if you like what you hear, please do share the link with your family and friends.

Till soon, I remain your faithful blogger

With love and affection, from Tehran Iran

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6 thoughts on “Hear ‘ye Hear ‘ye! Fig & Quince has a podcast!

  1. And here I was, fairly recently, thinking that I should start looking for podcasts in Farsi so that I could at least maintain a little bit of my ability to understand the language… And here you are, launching a podcast in Farsi! Your timing couldn’t have been better! Even though I know I won’t get everything, I’m really looking forward to listening.
    Thank you so much, Azita, for creating and sharing your podcast!

    (While we’re on the subject: if ever you know of other podcasts in Farsi that would be good for people who only speak a little Farsi but want to keep their ears trained and hopefully improve their understanding of it, I’d really appreciate your suggestions!)

    • Hi Linda! I miss blogging as well and feel terrible about neglecting it. I hope to get back on track soon. Thank you so much for continuing to come and visit and read and for reaching out. Means a lot! ❤

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