Scenes from Norooz 2012

The first day of spring marks the celebration of the Persian New Year – called Norooz – which literally means “new day” and is pronounced as “no rues”.

Doesn’t it seem fitting to start a new year at the very moment when winter ends and spring begins? Such a pretty and hopeful time of year – what with the slumber of winter ending and the awakening of critters and sprouting of blossoms and greens.

I would love to wax poetic about the traditions…

… and the yummy food associated with the Persian new year festivities …

… but by the time of this debut post, 13-bedar is already past and Norooz is officially over so it seems anticlimactic to go on about it at length.

We had such a sweet time celebrating it this year though that I couldn’t resist sharing some of our Norooz pictures with you.

The next post will be a recipe for Koofteh (stuffed Persian meatballs) that you’ll enjoy making and eating – so don’t miss it.

Until then: thanks for visiting & happy spring everyone!

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Comments (14)

  • Peace Of Iran 7 years ago Reply

    Your Haft Sin looks great! 🙂 Especially the Tut!

  • How nice! Thank you! 🙂 Re the toot: it was a lot of fun making it and surprisingly easy to make as well & everyone loved it. Will post recipe very soon if you want to make your own. Thanks for visiting.

  • petit4chocolatier 7 years ago Reply

    Beautiful pictures! Did you paint the pots for the plants? Love them!

    azita 7 years ago Reply

    Thank you! No those are egg holders and I thought I’d use them to grow the wheat grass and it came out pretty cute and goofy.

  • […] So now, Toot is also what we call the marvelous marzipan confection that is made to resemble this delicious fruit.  It uses dreamy ingredients like rosewater and cardamom and requires no baking:  just some prep work and then some zen hands-on assemblage.  Toot is typically served at weddings and it is also made for the Persian New Year.  In fact, the pictures you see here are from the batch that Maman and I made this past Norouz. […]

  • […] programming around here and instead will switch to barraging you with all-Norooz-all-the-time […]

  • […] and thick.  Not surprisingly, it is among the top tier of special foods coveted and served for Norooz — the Persian New Year, which is just around the […]

  • […] coat of granulated sugar; stemmed with a sliver of pistachio; typically served at weddings and for Norooz; and generally gobbled up with fingers, relish and […]

  • […] to the arranging of beautiful, elaborate and symbolic celebratory tableaux vivants for weddings, Norooz (New Year) and the fete of Yalda (winter solstice); to an inordinate fondness for gardens and […]

  • […] to the arranging of beautiful, elaborate and symbolic celebratory tableaux vivants for weddings, Norooz (New Year) and the fete of Yalda (winter solstice); to an inordinate fondness for gardens and […]

  • […] Iranian New Year is called Norooz. It is pronounced as if you’re going to say “no rues” and literally means: […]

  • […] The Iranian New Year is called Norooz. It is pronounced as if you’re going to say “no rues” and literally means: “New Day.” […]

  • […] design and to create the content so we first went live in April 2012 with a photo essay about my family’s celebration of Norooz.  In the beginning, my mom and I worked on the blog together, and we debated long and hard until […]

  • Rachelle 4 years ago Reply

    These books have actually rules for drawing forms,
    which will help you understand and draw the proper execution with appropriate rules.

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